Whatever You Do, Do Not, Look At The Robot...

Undefined

Many robots have various sorts of "visual" perception and detection sensors, many of which, in fact, are capable of operating well beyond the human visual range, into the ultraviolet, infrared, etc. This is unsettling enough, but it seems that these fearsome golems of silicon and wire will soon be outfitted with the ability to detect even the visual attention that we, even casually, pay to them.

So, when that first bead of nervous sweat rolls down your forehead, and your darting eyes begin to look for the nearest avenue of escape, the Evil Robot will have already deduced what it will need to do to make you into it's next portion of "people jerky" [ERN - It is strongly conjectured by us that many types of Evil Robot will, eventually, be configured to run on "people jerky", as a high energy, easily obtainable, fuel source "in the field". It just makes good sense - see our previous report(s) here]. Enter, "The Robot Simon"



Distance to target : 4.7 meters; Ambient Target Temperature: 37 degrees celsius; Jerky Extractor: ARMED...Distance to target : 4.7 meters; Ambient Target Temperature: 37 degrees celsius; Jerky Extractor: ARMED...

The banal robot stare of instant recognition...of your vitals...The banal robot stare of instant recognition...of your vitals...


"Getting someone's attention can be easy with a loud noise or a shout, but what if the situation calls for a little more tact? How can a robot use subtle cues to attract a human's notice and tell when it has captured it [ERN - and, in turn, capture the human itself, in a slightly undersized cage, and prepare it for jerky production]? In a preliminary study, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found that they can program a robot to understand when it gains a human's attention and when it falls short."


Full Story @ Robotics Trends